Tag Archives: chives

Deviled Eggs Revisited (Recipe)

I did deviled eggs last fall but I didn’t include a recipe. While I was stuffing my face with these last week I decided that something I love enough to overeat every time I make should be shared. I often find that the simplest things to make taste the best.

Ingredients:

  • 12 – Eggs.
  • 1/2 cup – Mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbsp – Dijon Mustard
  • 1 stick – Minced Celery
  • 12 Slices – Double Smoked Bacon
  • 24 – Cherry Tomatoes
  • Salt, Pepper, and Smoked Paprika to taste
  • Chopped Chives for garnish

 

Deviled Eggs

Click for full size

 

Method:

  1. Hard boil the eggs and take off the shell.
  2. Cut the eggs, in half, lengthwise and remove the yolk into a bowl.
  3. Use a fork to mash up the egg yolks and combine with the mayonnaise, dijon mustard, celery, salt, and pepper until smooth.
  4. Fill each egg white with the egg mixture.
  5. Fry off the bacon and use the smokey bacon fat to cook the cherry tomatoes in on medium heat until they just burst a little.
  6. Garnish with more minced celery and chopped chives.

Tips:

  • The egg mix can also be used in an egg salad sandwich (egg salad sandwiches with smoked bacon is in my top 10 all time best sandwiches).
  • They can be made in advance and stored in the fridge until you are ready to serve them.
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Bò Kho | Vietnamese Stewed Beef

Every Saturday growing up I would wake up to a big pot of food that would last the weekend. The two most popular pots of food that I would wake up to were Pho and Mi, but every once in a while I’d wake up to Bò Kho (Vietnamese Stewed Beef). Usually it would be a big pot filled with tons of stewing beef with large chunks of potatoes and carrots enjoyed with freshly baked bread. Admittedly, stewed beef was always my least favourite of the three. I decided that I would try giving the classic a bit of a facelift while trying to keep as much of what made the dish a classic intact.

Stewed Beef

Ingredients:

  • 1kg – Beef Brisket (cut into chunks).
  • 1.5 L – Coconut Water.
  • 1 large onion (diced).
  • 5 cloves garlic (diced).
  • 2 stalks lemongrass.
  • 1 stick cinnamon.
  • 2 roma tomatoes (peeled and diced).
  • juice of 1 lemon.
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce.
  • 2 potatoes (julienned).
  • 4 carrots (julienned).
  • Chives for garnish.

Method:

  1. Brown the chunks of brisket and reserve.
  2. In the same pot add the onions, garlic, lemongrass and cinnamon.
  3. Cook the onions until translucent and then add the tomatoes.
  4. Add the brisket back to the pot and cover with all the liquid ingredients (fish sauce, coconut water, lemon juice).
  5. Simmer for 2.5 hours.

Meanwhile:

  1. Cut carrots and potatoes into little matchsticks.
  2. Fry the potatoes until crispy and golden.
  3. Season with salt and pepper and toss together and reserve.

I like to sit the salad of potatoes and carrots on top of the beef stew. The crunchiness of the potatoes and carrots adds some textural contrast to the rich and succulent brisket. I finish the dish with chives here but you can toss any herb you want over this. My favourites include thai basil, thyme, and cilantro.

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Sour Cream & Chive Potato Salad

Usually I am inspired by classics that I love. Usually it is something I’ve grown up eating. This week however, I was inspired by something that always lets me down. This is of course mostly my fault since the only times I’ve eaten potato salad is when it comes as part of a combo involving chicken at the grocery store. The last potato salad I had was not too long ago from Loblaws. I decided I had had enough. I had to make my own to see what a real potato salad is like.

Potato Salad

Ingredients:

  • Potatoes cut into chunks roughly a sq. inch.
  • Sour Cream.
  • Chives.
  • 1/2 Celery stalk per potato, chopped.
  • Black Pepper.
  • Salt.
  • Olive Oil.

Method:

  1. Preheat oven with oven tray inside at 400f.
  2. In a bowl combine potatoes with olive oil, salt, and pepper (all to taste).
  3. When heated, place the oiled and seasoned potatoes onto the hot tray and put back in oven for 35 minutes.
  4. In the meantime chop the celery and the chives.
  5. Combine roasted potatoes with sour cream, celery, and chives in a bowl.

It turns out potato salad is a great accompaniment for chicken after all. It is a great dish you can make a lot of since it tastes great warm or cold. I often make enough potato salad to last me a few meals. I just have the potato salad hot the first time and cold all of the other times.

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Com Bi | Vietnamese Shredded Pork

I’ve been eating shredded pork since I can remember. It is a very traditional Vietnamese dish which my family still regularly makes. It is quite Vietnamese in the sense that there are very few components but they all compliment each other very well. I feel like what a lot of the modernization of cuisines all over the world have in common is this notion of keeping what is important to the classics and getting rid of anything nonessential. On top of more tasteful plating, I feel like there is definitely a more minimalist approach to food these days. I suppose that is why I’ve found it a bit more difficult to modernize Vietnamese food compared to other cuisines since traditional Vietnamese cuisine is fundamentally minimalistic already. Thus, although this shredded pork recipe is not by the book traditional, I wouldn’t say any modernization really happened.

Shredded Pork

Ingredients:

  • 200g pork chop
  • 2 tbsp roasted rice powder
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1/2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp white pepper
  • salt to taste

Method (Pork): 

  1. Cook the pork chop in a pan with butter until golden brown and cooked all the way through.
  2. Take out and cut into matchsticks and reserve in bowl.
  3. In a clean pan melt butter on medium high heat and add in garlic, sugar, fish sauce, and white pepper.
  4. Add the pork chop matchsticks back to the pan and incorporate over medium heat.
  5. In a separate pan warm up the roasted rice powder on medium low heat.
  6. Incorporate all ingredients from both pans.

Ingredients (Pickled Carrots):

  • Equal Parts water and white vinegar
  • sugar and salt to taste
  • carrots

Method (Pickled Carrots):

  1. Place the sugar, salt, water, and vinegar in a pot and bring to a boil.
  2. While this is happening julienne your carrots and place in a jar.
  3. Pour the boiling pickling liquid into the jar of carrots and leave overnight. (They will last for 4-6 weeks in the fridge)

I like to serve the shredded pork on rice. I top the pork with a medium fried egg and some pickled carrots and fresh cucumber. I like to finish the dish with chives, chive flowers, and some homemade fish sauce (I will blog about this soon).

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Hu Tieu Mi | Pork and Seafood Soup pt.1

This week I go back to my childhood again with this Vietnamese classic. Much like what I did with Pho (which you can see here), this post will only be part one of my exploration of Hu Tieu Mi. In this first instalment I will be looking at what makes this classic so delicious in order to understand how to approach modernizing the dish.

Hu Tieu Mi

 

Much like Pho, the secret to this soup is in the broth. It is made with pork bones, carrots, radishes, dried roasted squid, rock sugar, oyster sauce, and fish sauce. In the soup are some egg noodles, barbecue pork, pork liver, quail eggs, scored squid, and shrimp. Unlike Pho, this dish as quite a lot of components. This is where I think most of the problems arise. In traditional pho, beef is the very obvious focus. Everything about the dish is made in a way that enhances the flavour of the beef. In mi however, there are many delicious elements and it is challenging to bring the best out of all of them without overshadowing anything.

You would not think that all of these different types of meat would actually go together but it all tastes quite delicious. I usually only use one type of meat per dish and therefore the various types of meat in this dish is a bit unique to me. I suppose it is no different than my eating different types of vegetables in a stir fry.

Hu Tieu Mi

 

Classically, one dips the various types of meat in hoisin sauce (or at least that is what I did growing up). However, in the second picture I decide to add a brush of spicy hoisin to the plate before spooning over some broth. I actually enjoyed this method because it mitigated the often overly sweet characteristics of hoisin sauce.

I finish the dish with some deep fried onions and some fresh chives from the garden as well as some black pepper.

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Eggs on Croissant

I’m going to be straight with you; this is the best breakfast I can make. It comes as no surprise to me since the first thing I ever learned to cook was scrambled eggs. My mother taught me how to make scrambled eggs as a child and in the first few weeks of living without a meal plan I abused this knowledge. As I learned how to cook I continued to make scrambled eggs for breakfast. Over the years I have refined it again and again. This is where I’m at right now:

Eggs on Croissant w/ roasted tomato ketchup

I sit the parmesan scrambled eggs on smoked salmon in a croissant-which. The parmesan eggs are REALLY rich so I balance that with a smoked garlic tomato ketchup. I garnish with bacon, mushrooms, and chives.

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